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How you can benefit from the renewable heat incentive

How you can benefit from the renewable heat incentive

In recent years, it’s true to say that homeowners are becoming more environmentally and energy-saving savvy. It is generally understood that by switching off unused plugs and lights you may have just earned yourself a shopping-trip that month, or by comparing electricity and gas prices you could save enough for a summer holiday. But, how much do you know when it comes to Government grants and the financial incentives available to help you to go green?

The domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) was introduced in April 2014 with the promise of financial incentives to owners of renewable heating systems.

Many homeowners are wary of taking the step from the familiar gas, LPG or electric to renewable technology but the solutions are simple, you just have to know what’s available to you and which would suit your lifestyle.

  • Photovoltaic (PV) or solar panels convert light energy into electricity; the more light converted into electricity, the less electricity you’ll need from your energy provider and the lower your bill.

Consider PV Panels if: Your home is south-facing; your roof is not heavily-shaded.

  • Air source heat pumps (ASHPs) takes heat from the air and boosts it to a higher temperature using a heat pump to provide heat and hot water in your home.

Consider ASHPs if: Your home is well insulated and you have other heating-systems such as radiator-based or under-floor heating.

  • Ground source heat pumps

A ground source heat pump system harnesses natural heat from underground by pumping water through it. The heat is then increased via the pump and used to heat and provide hot water.

Consider GSHPs if: you have sufficient space for installation of the system 

  • Biomass-only boilers

A biomass boiler burns natural materials to provide central heating and hot water, in place of a gas or other boiler.

Consider Biomass-only boilers if: You have an area to store the biomass and have sufficient access for deliveries of it.

About the author

Paul Aitchison is the Product Manager, Heating and Cooling, Panasonic UK

Paul joined Panasonic Heating and Cooling in 2012 with a role to develop the air conditioning business further, providing Panasonic customers with a professional and well informed service which will allow them to make the best choice both environmentally and economically.  He has over ten years’ experience within the HVAC sector having previously been in a role within the construction industry and in particular within the field of environmental building solutions.

 

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