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How to get your head around SATs

The National Curriculum tests or SATs can seem like a daunting part of your child’s education, but if you know what to expect, they don’t need to be scary for you or your child!

Get your questions answered by Oxford Owl:

What tests do children take at the end of Year 2?

There are papers in:

  • Reading (2 papers, 40 marks, about 70 minutes)
  • Mathematics (2 papers, 60 marks, about 55 minutes)
  • English grammar, punctuation and spelling (2 papers, 40 marks, about 35 minutes)

Your child’s school will decide when in May to administer the tests. Tests are not strictly timed and children will be given breaks between the papers.

How are the tests marked?

At Key Stage 1, the teachers in your child’s school will mark the SATs papers. The mark your child gets in each test is called the ‘raw score’ (out of 40 for Reading, out of 60 for Mathematics, out of 40 for Grammar, punctuation and spelling).

This ‘raw score’ for each test will be translated into a ‘scaled score’, which will show how well your child has done against the expected standard. Children need to achieve a scaled score of 100 to meet the expected standard.

Above 100 means they are exceeding the expected standard; below 100 means they are still working towards the expected standard.

What tests do children take at the end of Year 6?

There are papers in:

  • Reading (1 paper, 50 marks, 60 minutes)
  • Mathematics (3 papers, 110 marks, 110 minutes)
  • English grammar, punctuation and spelling (2 papers, 70 marks, 60 minutes)

Tests are strictly timed, but children will be given breaks between the papers.

How are the tests marked?

At Key Stage 2, the SATs papers are marked externally by trained markers. The mark your child gets in each test is called the ‘raw score’ (out of 50 for Reading, out of 110 for Mathematics, out of 70 for English grammar, punctuation and spelling).

This ‘raw score’ for each test will be translated into a ‘scaled score’, which will show how well your child has done against the expected standard. Children need to achieve a scaled score of 100 to meet the expected standard.

Above 100 means they are exceeding the expected standard; below 100 means they are still working towards the expected standard. You will receive your child’s raw score and scaled score for each test and confirmation of whether or not they have achieved the expected standard.

For more information about what the tests will entail and how to help your child prepare at home, try Oxford Owl!

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